Business As Usual: Cagayan de Oro expected to ride out Marawi Conflict, martial law extension

Jul 25, 2017

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(Cagayan de Oro City 24 July 2017) Top officials of the National Economic and Development Authority expect the fall-out from the Marawi conflict and the extension of martial law in Mindanao to have little, if not positive effects, on Cagayan de Oro City.

 Raft Biz (Cover Photo)

Despite its relative proximity to Marawi City, located a three-hour drive from Cagayan de Oro, Socioeconomic Secretary and NEDA Sec. Gen. Ernesto M. Pernia said he expects Northern Mindanao and its capital city to successful weather the storm.

 

“If you look at the macro or bigger picture, martial law would not have a material impact , a consequential impact on the overall Philippine Development Plan,” Pernia said during a press conference following the launching of the PDP and Regional Development Plan for 2017-2022 at a local hotel here. “Even for Northern Mindanao, it will not be consequential or as disrupting on the RDP for Northern Mindanao.”

 

Socioeconomic Planning Sec. & NEDA Dir. Gen. Ernesto M. Pernia fields a question during the press conference (PIA-10)

Socioeconomic Planning Sec. & NEDA Dir. Gen. Ernesto M. Pernia fields a question during the press conference (PIA-10)

“I don’t think there will be a consequential disruption of business in Mindanao. Life seems to be going along normally, even Cagayan de Oro which is quite close to Marawi doesn’t seem to be affected by what’s going on there,” Pernia noted. “It’s business as usual really. In fact, martial law is also an environment that will make people safe. They will feel safe going about their business.”

 

During the same press conference, NEDA-10 Regional Director Leon M. Dacanay Jr. said he perceived the exodus of Marawi residents to Cagayan de Oro, Iligan and municipalities more as an opportunity for the subject localities, rather than disruptions.

 

“If you look at Northern Mindanao, basically Cagayan de Oro is the recipient of the IDPs coming from that place. We have evacuation centers in Iligan, Mindanao municipalities as well as Cagayan de Oro,” Dacanay said.

 

NEDA-10 Reg. Dir. Leon M. Dacanay Jr. answers a question during the press conference. (PIA-10)

NEDA-10 Reg. Dir. Leon M. Dacanay Jr. answers a question during the press conference. (PIA-10)

“Many of the evacuees coming from the Marawi area also have relatives in Cagayan de Oro. If we look at the data sets coming from DSWD, their figures are still rough estimates. Apparently, the well-off citizens are living with their relatives or on their own,” he observed.  

 

DSWD figures show the total number of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) as of 21 July 2017 pegged the total number of IDPs served in the region at 55,351 families consisting of 225,671 persons. The agency reported 35 evacuation centers in Region 10 housing 2,806 families or 13,129 persons while the number of home-based families at 52,645 comprising 212,542 persons.

DSWD-10 Marawi Clash Disaster Response Update as of July 21, 2017

DSWD-10 Marawi Clash Disaster Response Update as of July 21, 2017

 

The number of active Evacuation Centers (ECs) in Region 10 was as follows: Iligan City – 5; Balo-i – 11; Pantar – 1; Pantao Ragat – 17; Cagayan de Oro City – 1.

 

“So you can see the possible impact on Northern Mindanao is the aid that will initially come in for Marawi will be ported in Northern Mindanao, particularly those that are hosting the evacuation centers, particularly Iligan and the municipalities in Lanao del Norte,” he added.

 

Pernia said a rehabilitation fund for the construction of Marawi has already been allocated, which could further trickle down to nearby urban centers and communities.

 

Residents flee Marawi City as a building burns in the distance (photo by Froilan Gallardo)

Residents flee Marawi City as a building burns in the distance (photo by Froilan Gallardo)

 “P5-billion is already available for Marawi rehab for 2017 and there will be assistance coming from other countries like the US, Australia, Japan and even China,” Pernia said. “European countries are also like to be coming to help. Even the private sector like the Lucio Tan Foundation has pledged to extend assistance for housing, so there will be different kinds of support coming from different sectors, to be led by the government.”

 

A volunteer teaches english language to bakwit children in Saguiaran, Lanao sur on Wednesday. Photo by Froilan Gallardo

A volunteer teaches english language to bakwit children in Saguiaran, Lanao sur on Wednesday. Photo by Froilan Gallardo

“So it’s (martial law) not really a hindrance. It’s more of ensuring people that their lives and their businesses are not in danger,” he added.

 

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